Stew’s Rant Corner:Magic Realm

In this Second Edition of Stew’s Rant Corner, Stew discusses a classic 1979 Avalon Hill Bookcase Game: Magic Realm, a game that was ahead of its time in many, many ways, but suffered from a fatal flaw.

Magic Realm 01


 

Have you ever had that game where you love the art, like the basic premises of the game, enjoy the attention to detail, and the storyline takes you away to that awesome place, but the rules trip you up and leave you wanting to love a game that you just can’t? If you have ever tried or played Avalon Hill’s 1979 release of Magic Realm, then you know what I mean.

The Game is SOOOO Cool!

Before I dig into the details, let me make it very clear, I SOOOO want to love this game, but I just can’t. Ask me if I like Magic Realm, and I will say, definitely, “Yes!” Ask me if I like playing Magic Realm, and I will say, “Yes!” So, why can I not love this game; read on and find out.

Magic Realm was released in 1979, and as you can see from the cover art, it is a fantasy game of adventure, individual battles, and magic. Truly, Magic Realm appeared to be Avalon Hill’s attempt to capture a role-playing game in a board game. Magic Realm contains various playable heroes, many dangerous monsters, magic items, spells, enchanted locations and random encounters. What more could any one person want? Let me be fair, I think Avalon Hill did a splendid job with Magic Realm, and here is why. I loved the art work from the moment I saw it. I loved the random game board. I loved the combat system. I loved the random encounter system. I hated that some of the character adventurers could run into certain monsters and simply had no chance: your game was over. Read on and let me explain more.

Before Its Time: Campaigns, Double-Sided Tiles, Character Cards, and Random Monsters

First, Avalon Hill laid out Magic Realm into seven playable campaigns, meant to be played sequentially, teaching any potential players the rules a few at a time. Avalon succeeded brilliant with this, as the rules make sense, are easy to follow, and you learn them a small portion at a time: beginning with searching, then fighting, they monsters, treasurers, spells, etc., until the you are playing the entire campaign game looking for victory points to prove that you are the most experienced and fame worthy adventurer. In order to facilitate this, Magic Realm had, at the time, some new and innovative mechanics. First, the hexagonal tiles provided an ever-changing landscape, different with each game. Also, these tiles representing woods, caves, and mountain passes, could be “enchanted” and flipped over to a side where they not only changed the direction paths and roads led, but they also supported one of the three different colors of magic. I can not say if Magic Realm was the first game with hexagonal tiles that could be laid out randomly to create a different map every game, but it certainly worked and we all have seen that same random map structure used in many games today.

Magic Realm 02

The Hex Tiles.  The top 3 are examples of the “normal” side and the bottom 3 examples of the “enchanted” side.

Magic Realm also had Character Cards with the statistics, powers, weapons, and spells for each adventurer that a player could choose. These character cards also contained four levels that each player could be in their development of their craft, starting with a brand new adventurer to a seasoned campaigning veteran. Magic Realm also used a unique way to randomly introduced monsters onto the map by providing “Warning” and “Sound” counters that could be laid out at random, which when revealed interacted with the “Appearance Chart”. Other counters, laid out at random, would reveal the location of different buildings or places that could contain either more monsters, treasures, spells, or natives that could be hired to help. All of this was wonderful, easy to play, and quite enjoyable. Now, let’s talk about combat.

 

The mosaic above shows clockwise from top left: the campaign “Personal History Pad”, the “Treasure Set Up/Monster Appearance” Chart, the plethora of counters, and the Character Cards (examples in top row of art on the front and examples in bottom row of stats on the back).

A Truly Good Idea: The Combat Matrix Chart…

One of the best, and perhaps worst, mechanics was the fighting chart with the “Move” and “Fight” counters. The idea was for each combat the adventurer would choose a fight and a move counter; placing them on the combat chart into one of three locations. The monster would then randomly be placed on a place on the battle chart as well. This created a rock vs paper situation where two rules applied; if the speed of the monster was faster than the adventurer’s move, the adventurer was struck, the monster could also hit the adventurer by being placed opposite the location of the adventurer’s move counter. The attack for the adventurer on the monster was the same. Armor, weapons, and spells were then taken into account. This created a unique combat system, where sometimes no one was hit, and others both were struck. However, if the first strike killed the character, no strike on the monster would be made, and of course, vice versa.

Magic Realm 07

The Combat Matrix

…That Went So Horribly Wrong!

Here, however, is where Magic Realm broke down completely. Take the “Black Knight” character. He wore armor, wasn’t very fast, and used a mace that was hard hitting, but not overly so. Now take a certain “Tremendous” troll. It struck faster than the Black Knight could possibly move, did the most damage possible in the game, and was too tough for the Black Knight to hurt it. What resulted was a situation where the Black Knight was struck every time, and if he had tremendous armor on, could survive one such strike, but the Black Knight could not kill the troll, and the troll was too fast for the Black Knight to run and get away. This combination ALWAYS resulted in the death of the Black Knight. And here lies the fatal flaw of Magic Realm: no one likes to play a game that they can just randomly lose. If the Black Knight runs into other monsters, everything is ok, but if he ran into the Tremendous Troll, he was dead. Sort of made me want to run the random encounter at the start of the game, just to see if their was any point in playing it.

 

This flaw, and a major flaw it is, does not exist for all characters, just some, but enough to make you not want to play. The more times I played Magic Realm–and I played a lot of Magic Realm, because I SOOOO wanted to love this game! I loved everything about it, but the random fatality of certain characters–the more I gave up on the game. So, in a nut shell, do I hate Magic Realm and wish I had never played it? No. I just wish it had been play tested better ahead of time. I encourage all of you to find this game in a hobby shop, or online, and give Magic Realm a try. You will fall in love with it, and you will be frustrated by it, all at the same time. It is a good example of why play-testing is so important nowadays, and obviously, back then.

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Pandemic Legacy July Playthrough Part 2

After our stunning victory in June (see Pandemic Legacy June Playthrough) the Toledo Tuesdays Gaming Club (info here ) now was moving on to July.

— SPOILER ALERT BEGINS HERE —

IF YOU HAVE NOT PLAYED THE JULY EPISODE OF PANDEMIC LEGACY YET, DO NOT READ THIS BLOG UNTIL YOU DO. PLENTY OF INFORMATION ABOUT THAT THE JULY EPISODE IS REVEALED HERE.

— SPOILER ALERT ENDS HERE —

Recap: In the first six months, the disease in Asia (i.e. the red cubes) mutated into the non-treatable and incurable COdA virus. In April the virus further mutated into the COdA-403c virus and the afflicted became the Faded, with ground zero for the new mutation in Ho Chi Minh City.  We suffered a crushing defeat in our first attempt at the May episode as Moscow melted down, while the Blue and Yellow viruses spread like wildfire across the Americas and Africa.  Outbreaks came at lightning speed and we lost due to the too many outbreaks rule.  In a heroic effort in the second episode of May, we triumphed and kept the diseases under control.  A rather lucky draw of cards in June allowed us to triumph in our first attempt.  But now the government was barely funding events, so July looked to be a tough month.  In our first attempt in July we lost so quickly that one of the three players didn’t get a second turn! We did however find the Virologist.  See review here (Pandemic Legacy July Episode – Part One).

July Part 2 Setup

We had a strange draw of cards, with an unusual number of Red (Faded) cards being drawn.  We had 3 Faded in Beijing and Bangkok and 2 Faded in Manila and Seoul and not a single Blue (Fischer-Titus) cube on the board!  We had a Funded Event total of 4 so we selected the One Quiet Night, Local Initiative, Resilient Population, and Remote Treatment cards.

Our friend Kristie joined us this week, so we had 5 players.  With only rules for a 4-player game, we decided that Bob and Stew would work together.  Seeing the clear threat of the Faded in Asia, we knew that someone would have to be the Quarantine Specialist.  After determining play order, here are our character picks:

  • Bob/Stew — Researcher
  • Neal — Medic
  • Lee — Scientist
  • Kristie — Quarantine Specialist

We used our June win bonus to add some roadblocks to the board.

Here is what the board looked like after set-up was finished:

Pan Leg July Part 2 01

July Part 2 Start — Note all the Faded!

Gameplay

The basic idea was for the Quarantine Specialist to stay in Asia and deal with the Faded while the Researcher/Scientist combo powered out cures and the Medic mopped up cubes.

Turn 1

The Researcher was first and quarantined Bangkok.  The Medic removed cubes in Baghdad and Washington.  The Scientist picked up a blue card from the Researcher and flew to N. America where he blockaded western routes from San Francisco.  The Quarantine Specialist quarantined Seoul, Kolkata and Hong Kong.

Turn 2

The Researcher moved to Kolkata and flew to N. America to get to San Francisco to be with the Scientist.  They drew the 1st Epidemic and it was in London.  The Medic moved toward some cubes and drew the 2nd Epidemic in Istanbul, which led to an outbreak in Seoul (#1) which spread to Shanghai (#2).  The Scientist cured both Blue (Fischer-Titus) and after getting a card, Yellow (BSNL-419) and played One Quiet Night to not draw some dangerous infection cards on his turn.  The Quar. Spec. quarantined Ho Chi Minh City.

Turn 3

The Researcher treated Santiago in an effort to eradicate BSNL-419.  The Medic ferried trans-Atlantic and treated London.  The Scientist treated Kinshasa and BSNL-419 was eradicated (Objective #1 completed).  The Quar. Spec. put down quarantines in Osaka and Shanghai as the Faded continued to multiply from infection cards and the players drawing Red (Faded) cities from the Player Deck (This is the Accelerated Incubation rule).

Turn 4

The Researcher moved to Khartoum to be with the Scientist.  The Medic dropped a military base in Paris (a card the Medic had since the start of the game), thus establishing a military base in all 6 regions (Objective #2) as we started the game with 5 permanent military bases.  The Scientist went to Riyadh and drew the 3rd Epidemic card.  The Quar. Spec. dropped an Airstrike on Manila to reduce the Faded in that city from 3 to 2 as it had no quarantine marker on it and could be draw in a re-shuffled Infection Deck.  As it happened, Madrid had an outbreak (#3) but it did not cause any chain outbreak due to the Medic’s previous action in London.  The Quar. Spec. used her turn to quarantine Shanghai and Bangkok.

Turn 5

The Researcher quarantined Karachi.  The Medic moved to Riyadh and got the matching card from the Scientist and cured Black (Sprague), thus completing the mandatory objective of curing the 3 non-Faded diseases (Objective #3)–Winning the game!

Here is the map at the end of the game:

Pan Leg July Part 2 02

July Part 2 End — note all the Blue and Faded on the board!  But we won anyway!

For our end game upgrades we chose:

  1. Add 3 permanent roadblocks–2 around Beijing and the other from Tokyo to San Francisco.
  2. Adding the “Easier Agents” upgrade to BSNL-419.  Now the cure could be discovered with one fewer card.

We did not put down our 6th permanent military base in Paris because the July Win Bonus will allow us to do that at the start of August (yay!).  We adjusted our Funded Event total back down to 2.  August is going to be tough!

Epic Spell Wars of the Battle Wizards: Duel at Mt. Skullzfyre

 

What Did we Play?

Okay, remember when you were a kid?  I know, I know, that was a long time ago, but let’s try.  You totally liked to play board games and you thought that you could make up your own games.  I know my brother and I thought this way.

So we grabbed some paper, some cardboard, some markers, etc, and made up a bunch of games that we thought were really cool!  And one of those games was a wizard spell battle!  Does anybody remember the Monster Maker (sometimes it was the Hero Maker)?  It looked like your sister’s Fashion Maker game, you know, the one with the set of flaps hinged on the left.  You could change the top, the middle, and/or the bottom flap by flipping the sheets of paper to make the outfit/monster/hero of your dreams.

Well, all of us played around with a similar idea for a wizard battle.  What if we could customize a spell in the same way?  Well, the geniuses at Cryptozoic behind Epic Spell Wars of the Battle Wizards: Duel at Mt. Skullzfyre (EPSWotBW:DaMS) actually did just that!

Epic Spell Wars 01

Check out the art!  This game just looks cool!

How do you know that this game is going to be totally rad?  It says so on the back of the box!  “Are you Rad enough for gnarly wizard on wizard magical combat?”  “Do you have the Balls to totally melt a dude’s face…with Magic?!?”  “Rip your opponents a new one with INSANE spell combos!”  Combine these bold proclamations with the cool retro art and you just know that this game is totally rad!

The TTGC (About) recommends that you try out Epic Spell Wars of the Battle Wizards!  Why?  Because it is a blast to play!  The promise of the box is fulfilled by the contents.  Basically, each player is a wizard with 20 hit points.  Here are a couple examples.  The characters do not have special abilities, it is merely chrome.

Epic Spell Wars 02

Two examples of wizards.  I think you can see the tongue in cheek nature of Epic Spell Wars.

Each player has a hand of 8 cards.  During a round each player chooses up to 3 spell cards and creates a unique spell.  There are 3 spell components: Source, Quality, and Delivery.  Players can utilize up to 1 card of each component (you can choose to not include 1 or 2 of the components).  The delivery cards also include an initiative number with more powerful delivery cards going slower than weaker cards.  Wizards who created spells with only 1 component go first in the round, wizards with two components go next and then wizards with a complete 3 component spell go last.  turn order within those three groups is by the delivery initiative number or at random if a delivery component is missing.

Basically, each player creates a spell and hurls it at his/her opponents.  Here is an example of a spell.

Epic Spell Wars 03

Pam and Hecuba’s Explodifying Testikill

After all the wizards cast their spells, each player draws back to 8 cards and the next round begins.  The game is played until only a single player remains.  The winning player gets a “Last Man Standing” token and all the other players get a “Dead Wizard” card, which could offer help in the next game.  All players discard their hands and a new game begins.  The first player to get 2 Last Man Standing tokens is the winner.

There is a bit more to the game than this, including Treasure cards, spell elements, combinations, wild cards, etc, but I will let you discover for yourself how all that works after you get a copy of Epic Spell Wars and turn your opponents into bubbling piles of blood and bone with INSANE spells!  For the more tactical players, there is a good deal of timing strategy, especially sacrificing components for speed.  When everyone’s hit points are getting low, it might be better to cast a quick weak spell than load up a slow Gorenado!  Whaaaaaat?  The game is not only fun and cool, but also has a bit of depth and strategy to it.  How rad is that!?!

Trust me, you will have fun playing Epic Spell wars.  Now get out there are start Melting Faces with Magic!

Pandemic Legacy July Episode – Part One

After our stunning victory in June (see Pandemic Legacy June Playthrough) the Toledo Tuesdays Gaming Club (info here ) now was moving on to July.

— SPOILER ALERT BEGINS HERE —

IF YOU HAVE NOT PLAYED THE JULY EPISODE OF PANDEMIC LEGACY YET, DO NOT READ THIS BLOG UNTIL YOU DO. PLENTY OF INFORMATION ABOUT THAT THE JULY EPISODE IS REVEALED HERE.

— SPOILER ALERT ENDS HERE —

Recap: In the first six months, the disease in Asia (i.e. the red cubes) mutated into the non-treatable and incurable COdA virus. In April the virus further mutated into the COdA-403c virus and the afflicted became the Faded, with ground zero for the new mutation in Ho Chi Minh City.  We suffered a crushing defeat in our first attempt at the May episode as Moscow melted down, while the Blue and Yellow viruses spread like wildfire across the Americas and Africa.  Outbreaks came at lightning speed and we lost due to the too many outbreaks rule.  In a heroic effort in the second episode of May, we triumphed and kept the diseases under control.  A rather lucky draw of cards in June allowed us to triumph in our first attempt.  But now the government was barely funding events, so July looked to be a tough month.

July Setup

At the start of July we got a new mission: search for the Virologist.  It seemed that a virologist was missing and that we had been assigned to find her.  We needed to “Search” (spend an action and a matching color card) at research stations and to do it quickly.  Each time an Epidemic card was drawn, the search for the Virologist would get a little bit longer.  Other than that, the missions were the same: complete 3 missions, with curing 3 diseases being mandatory.  Then complete 2 of the following: eradicate 1 disease, put up a military base in each of the 6 regions, and find the virologist.

We went through the normal set up steps and here is what the board looked like just before we began:

Pan Leg July 01

The start.  We are all in Kolkata. 

Lee was out this week, so it was just the 3 of us.  We looked at the board and we made some key decisions.  First, we had only 2 funded events, which meant that epidemics would be drawn pretty quickly on top of each other. We realized that our odds of winning were slim so we wanted to get something done that would have a permanent effect–even if we lost.  Two, curing diseases and eradicating one of them would be our secondary priority.  We have plenty of favorable mutations upgrades which might help us achieve these objectives.  Three, we really wanted to find the Virologist, so it would be the top priority.  We figured that whatever bonus came with finding her would be helpful in a later game.  Four, we would only try to place military bases if that option looked good given our initial card draw.  We placed our June win bonus blockades in a way to stop the Faded from moving to Shanghai (see below why we chose this) or spreading to North America.

So, here are our character choices in turn order:

  • Stew – Operations Expert
  • Bob – Researcher
  • Neal — Scientist

We decided to start in Kolkata.  The idea was that the Operations Expert would go to Shanghai, drop a research station, and then use his Shanghai card and other red card to get a quick jump on finding the virologist.  The other two would work on curing diseases.

Gameplay

Well my droogies, guess how this game turned out?  About as bad as it gets!  It was so short that I will break it down in player turns.

Stew’s 1st turn: he moved to Shanghai, placed a research station and quarantined the city.  His first card drawn was an Epidemic!  And in Lima, right next to the 3 cubes in Santiago!  And when drawing the 2 cards from the Infection deck, Karachi had an outbreak.

Bob’s 1st turn: he handed off some cards to the Scientist and then went to Shanghai to help the Ops Expert.  Then he drew Milan from the infection deck and now we had our 2nd outbreak.

Neal’s 1st turn: he flew to Atlanta and then dropped a military base in New York.  This was our 4th base as we started with 3 permanent bases in Lima, Riyadh, and Ho Chi Minh City.  Then he drew the Santiago infection card, so that was outbreak #3 and Lima had a chain reaction outbreak for #4.

Stew’s 2nd turn: Ops Expert builds a military base in Shanghai, our 5th.  By this time, we knew that we were in big trouble given the number of outbreaks on the 1st round.  We decided that we would try to find the virologist and find places where we might want some permanent military bases.  The Ops Expert then searched for and found the Virologist.  Which to our surprise did NOTHING to help us.  Or at least nothing right now, we assume that her finding of the gene sequence for CodA will be helpful in a later month.  Anyway, during the infection step he drew St. Petersburg which had an outbreak #4, leading to a chain reaction outbreak in Essen #5, and then in Milan #6.

Bob’s 2nd turn: By this point we were doomed.  We struggled to find any actions for the Researcher that had any positive  impact.  But we did figure out that if he put a military base in Lagos, maybe we would want to make it permanent during the endgame upgrades.  So he traveled to Lagos and dropped a military station there, completing our 2nd optional mission.  But the end was near.  Why?  Because he drew Lima from the infection deck which had an outbreak #7 and Santiago had a chain reaction outbreak #8 — Game Over!

Neal’s 2nd turn: never got it!  So sad! Yeah, that’s right, your faithful narrator Neal only got 1 turn!  How very sad me droogies!

Here is a pic of the debacle:

Pan Leg July 02

End of the game.  Note the successful “Search for the Virologist” card at top.  Also see the Lima-Santiago outbreak factory and poor Europe overrun with disease!

Upgrade Choices

We upgraded the temporary military bases in Lagos and New York to permanent military bases.  We figured that doing so should make completing the military base mission super easy in our next go through in July.  If the optional mission remained in later months, it would probably also be easy to complete.  We even thought of the cheesy move of placing another permanent military base down at the end of the next July playthrough–thus automatically completing the military base mission at the start of August!  Cheese indeed!

We moved the funded event total up to 4 and now we are ready to try again in a couple of weeks.

By the way, the Faded have literally done nothing since they arrived in this game.  They have almost never been on the board and have never been the source of an outbreak across 4 months now.  Very strange.

Pandemic Legacy June Playthrough

After our victory in our second attempt in May (see Pandemic Legacy May Playthrough Round Dos) the Toledo Tuesdays Gaming Club (info here ) now was moving on to June.

— SPOILER ALERT BEGINS HERE —

IF YOU HAVE NOT PLAYED THE JUNE EPISODE OF PANDEMIC LEGACY YET, DO NOT READ THIS BLOG UNTIL YOU DO. PLENTY OF INFORMATION ABOUT THAT THE JUNE EPISODE IS REVEALED HERE.

— SPOILER ALERT ENDS HERE —

Recap: In the first five months, the disease in Asia (i.e. the red cubes) mutated into the non-treatable and incurable COdA virus. In April the virus further mutated into the COdA-403c virus and the afflicted became the Faded, with ground zero for the new mutation in Ho Chi Minh City.  We suffered a crushing defeat in our first attempt at the May episode as Moscow melted down, while the Blue and Yellow viruses spread like wildfire across the Americas and Africa.  Outbreaks came at lightning speed and we lost due to the too many outbreaks rule.  In a heroic effort in the second episode of May, we triumphed and kept the diseases under control.

June Setup

The initial setup was a bit favorable.  The only Faded card drawn was Beijing.  We used the Win Bonus from May to put up two blockades around Beijing to stop the Faded from spreading.  We also blockaded the line from Tokyo to San Francisco just in case the Faded wanted to spread to North America. Milan and Karachi were of concern, but they were geographically close.  Santiago looked to be a problem but at least there was no disease at all in North America.

Pan Leg June start

June Start–Note that the only Faded drawn are in Beijing, and we blockaded it.

So, we picked characters and Neal was randomly determined to play first.  We decided to stick with the characters that had used in May.  We thought the board looked favorable to a Medic sweeping cubes while the Researcher/Scientist team cured diseases and the Dispatcher got us back together as needed.

  • Neal — Medic
  • Lee — Scientist
  • Stew — Dispatcher
  • Bob — Researcher

Our plan of attack was to try to eradicate at least one disease and put down the 6 military bases.  We had 4 funded events and mainly chose cards to manipulate or delay the infection deck and stop outbreaks from getting worse.  We had a nice spread of locations in our initial card draw, plus with two permanent military bases on the board already (Lima and Ho Chi Minh City) we felt that it would not be difficult to get 4 more military bases up.  So we were going to ignore the quarantine mission if possible.

Gameplay

We got off to a fast start.  On the 2nd turn the Scientist cured Blue (Fischer-Titus in our game) after getting cards from the Scientist and Medic. We have been taking Positive Mutations as end game upgrades and they are really starting to pay off in speeding up the discovery of cures.

But then things got a bit more hairy.  Also the 2nd turn we drew the 2nd epidemic right on the heels of the first epidemic and Los Angeles had an outbreak!  North America went from no problem at all to our worst hotspot!  Fortunately, at the end of the 2nd turn the Researcher treated the last Fischer-Titus cube and Blue was eradicated.  One mission down by the 8th player-turn (two full turns around the table).

On the 3rd turn, the Medic found a cure for Black (Sprague in our game).  And also immediately thereafter, the 3rd epidemic card was drawn and Sao Paolo burst with the BSNL-419 disease!  Los Angeles, Tehran, and Sao Paolo were all in big trouble as their cards were shuffled back onto the top of the deck!

And then the Faded started to become a problem too!  Shenghai had been drawn earlier as both a player card (see the Accelerated Incubation rule) and an infection card twice.  It now threatened to produce a Faded outbreak!  Fortunately, on the 4th turn the Airstrike event was drawn and we used it to smack Shenghai (sorry residents of the city, I hope there was no collateral damage!).

Also on the 4th turn, the Scientist cured BSNL-419, which was only possible because of our positive mutation upgrade that allowed for finding a cure 1) without being in a research station and 2) without having to use an action.  Otherwise, the Scientist would’ve been one action short.  So now the mandatory mission was complete.

Later in the 4th turn, the Dispatcher put our 5th military base down in Riyadh.  Now we needed only one more to win the game.  But then we got into real big trouble!  We had so many BSNL-419 left on the map, that we didn’t have any more Yellow cubes in the supply.  And Santiago was going to be the next infection card drawn (we knew this by remembering which infection cards had been recycled by the Epidemic draws).

Fortunately for us, the Dispatcher had the Local Initiative event card.  He put a quarantine marker on Santiago, which saved our bacon!  We cleaned up a few Yellow cubes and then the Medic was going to treat Santiago at the start of the 5th turn.  The Medic did just that and then flew to Istanbul, ferried to Cairo and dropped a military base in Cairo and we won the game!  Sometimes you have to be very lucky…and we got very lucky to draw so many event cards with only 4 in the deck (plus a couple Endgame Upgrade events placed on Red cards).

And did I mention yet that Moscow became a Fallen city!  Man, we have had such a tough time keeping that place under control.

Pan Leg June end

The end of the game in June–look at all those Yellow cubes!  And check out the Red Fallen 5 on Moscow. 

Endgame Upgrades

We decided to make Blue (Fischer-Titus) “Efficient to Sequence” so that we could deal with it quicker in every subsequent game.  We then put a permanent military base in Riyadh.  We adjusted our Funded Event total down to 2 (Yikes!) and congratulated ourselves on a game well played…and also on our exceptional luck.