Star Wars Rebellion — Labor Day Fun and Freedom in the Galaxy

This Labor Day my brother and I finally got around to playing a game of Star Wars Rebellion. We had been interested in playing a game for a while. And we had two reasons why this game looked attractive.

Freedom in the Galaxy

First, the game is a new version of the old SPI game Freedom in the Galaxy. If you aren’t familiar with that game, it was released in 1979 and features a band of rebels taking on an evil galactic empire. The empire also has a “Planetary Stabilizer” by which it could destroy planets. The rebels had a secret base and tried to use subversive missions to unseat the dastardly empire. Sound familiar?

Freedom in the Galaxy was a thinly veiled Star Wars…but it couldn’t use that name or any other direct reference to George Lucas’ movie. But we all knew what we were playing, and Freedom in the Galaxy was a good game. It captured the fun of the Star Wars movie in a great board game.

— Freedom in the Galaxy. My copy is unpunched. My brother has the more well worn version that we used in our childhood

Fantasy Flight Reimagining and Star Wars

Second, Fantasy Flight was going to redo Freedom in the Galaxy. FFG had already reimagined the great Avalon Hill Game Dune. They updated the rules, board, and components and put out the new game as Rex. FFG couldn’t call it Dune because they had the rights to the game and rules, but not to Frank Herbert’s product. Thus, FFG set Rex in its Twilight Imperium universe. The game is good, but somehow not being set in the Dune universe took something intangible away from the game.

When I heard that Fantasy Flight Games had bought the rights to both the Star Wars license and the Freedom in the Galaxy game, I knew they would get it right this time.

Star Wars Rebellion

And this game is fun! FFG streamlined the rules, primarily by ditching the world environments and different ground units, upgraded the components, and added all the desired Star Wars elements. Now you have an actual Death Star miniature, along with all the other Star Wars personalities and units. The core of Freedom in the Galaxy is still there, hidden rebel base, missions, quick combat, so this is basically the same game…but updated from a 1979 game and made into a 2010s game with all the cards, minis, and chips that you expect from a FFG game.

— Star Wars Rebellion, the reimagining by Fantasy Flight Games

So things have come full circle: a game that was Star Wars that couldn’t call itself Star Wars is now called Star Wars Rebellion. The good game that Freedom in the Galaxy was is still there…but now you don’t have to imagine that Zina Adora is Princess Leia.

Now I can’t wait to integrate the Star Wars Rise of the Empire expansion. It has all the Rogue One content. I loved that movie!

Scythe: The Rise of Fenris — Episode One

— the new expansion/campaign for Scythe is out. Let’s get ready to rumble!

I picked up my order of Scythe: Rise of Fenris from Meeplesource at Gen Con 2018. My gang of friends was ready to get started right away, so we got a game in yesterday. I might give away a few spoilers, so you are forewarned! And remember to be forewarned is to have four arms! Wait…that’s not right. Oh well, you understand what I am trying to say.

The Premise: The Search for Tesla

The basic idea of the campaign is that the disastrous and inconclusive Great War is over. The city-sized Factory run by Nikola Tesla that supplied all the designs for the Mechs has gone silent. It’s 1921 and the Europa powers are back on their feet. They also are trying to get into Tesla’s Factory to see what is in the sealed inner vault. (As an aside, I hope Gerardo Rivera is not involved and that there is going to be more in Tesla’s vault than Al Capone’s Vault.)

Anyway, the set up for the first game is pretty much like a normal game of Scythe, except for three differences. First, an extra Objective Card is flipped over and placed near the objective track. Each player can try to complete this Objective in addition to their normal Objective requirements. Second, each player can pick a “perk” and add its bonus to their starting position. For example, there are +2 resources, +1 starting worker, +3 Power, etc. Third, an Influence Marker is placed on each of the 10 possible Achievements plus one marker on the revealed common Objective Card.

— a couple of the Influence markers

It wasn’t explained in the rules what the Influence tokens would be used for, but whomever was first to the achievement could grab the token.

The Game

There were four of us. Stew played the Rusviet Union and got to go first. Lee was next with the Togawa Shogunate, I was third with Saxony, and Bob last with Clan Albion. Lee got off to a quick start by upgrading his board to reduce the cost of more upgrades to a single resource. Stew was first to the Factory and looked to be catching up. I developed my mechs quicker than the others, allowing my Character to move quickly around the map looking for Exploration card bonuses. Bob focused on slow expansion and placing his flags.

As the game moved along, I slowly gained the most Influence tokens, mainly from being the first to complete an Objective, Build all my mechs, and place all my workers. I got to the Factory second but the cards there were not all that good. I retreated in the face of Lee and his Shogunate mechs, and he eventually got into the Factory.

As the end game approached, Stew, Lee and myself were getting close to the sixth Achievement, but each didn’t want to end the game from a losing position. Lee had a lot of hexes controlled, Stew had a lot of coins, Bob had top tier Popularity, and I was arguably in last. When it looked like my situation couldn’t get better, I stormed the Factory with two Mechs and knocked Lee’s Character out of it–but at a high cost! The Shogunate Trap was a -2 Popularity which sunk me down out of the second-tier and back to the first-tier, costing me roughly 15 coins!

Lee and his Shogunate ended up victorious with 81 coins, Stew’s Rusviet were second with 73, while Bob’s Clan Albion and my Saxons we’re tied at 53.

Each player now could mark on their Campaign Log the Achievements that they completed. For each Achievement, a player marks a spot on their Triumph Log. At the end of the campaign, completed rows and columns will give a coin bonus.

— Lee’s Campaign Log. Note that he got to mark his Episode One victory.

The Influence Vote: Peace or War?

After calculating victory, we learned what those Influence tokens were for. Each player was given 1 extra Influence token on top of what they earned. Each player then secretly allocated their Influence tokens into two hidden piles: any in the closed left hand was a vote for war, and any in the closed right hand was a vote for peace. We made our choices and then revealed simultaneously. Saxony and Rusviet had 7 votes for war and zero for peace, while Clan Albion and Togawa had 0 votes for war and 5 for peace. 7 to 5 for War!!!

The campaign has two separate sets of rules for the second episode: one for peace and one for war. This is pretty cool as different groups and/or second attempts at the campaign can have different episodes. Sweet!

Anyway, the first episode didn’t differ much from the base game, but given this war vs peace vote, we are expecting it to lead to some sort of big changes in the next episode. See you there!

Star Realms: Frontiers and Beyond!

When I got back from Gen Con there was a huge package waiting for me. Guess what was in it?

— Wow, that’s a lot of Star Realms

I got my shipment of the latest expansion to Star Realms–Frontiers….and more. A year or so ago I added Star Realms into our Tuesday night rotation. It’s a fairly simple deck building game that combines the easy to learn/play dynamics of a CCG/TCG like Magic: the Gathering. Basically draft ships and bases, then unleash them on your opponent. Last player standing is the winner. I have recently been teaching my oldest boy to play it. Star Realms is simple and lighthearted with only a small degree of strategy (basically buy cards that combo together) plus lots of luck. A great game when you don’t want to think too much and have a boatload of fun.

Anyway, now I have every published expansion plus a wild amount of promos…and a great big box to put all the cards in!

Yee-haw!

My Haul at Gen Con

Gen Con was fun again this year! My bro and I walked for miles searching for both new and classic games. What did we find….inquiring minds want to know! Well my faithful friends, read on, read on for the answer!

— day one loot!

In the photo above you can see what I found on day one!

Smash Up! Oops, You Did It Again — I found this new expansion that I was looking for. Can’t wait to get in some Smash Up Games with these four new factions.

Scythe: Rise of Fenris — Is this expansion a set of alternate game rules (i.e. modules), a legacy campaign, or both!

Too Many Bones: Undertow — I kickstarted this game. It looks like a really fun dice builder. The components inside are top-quality. And many thanks to the guys at the booth who switched out the duplicate dice for the omitted dice that were missing from my box.

Horizons — A 4x space game. I love these sort of games (e.g. Eclipse, Ascending Empires, Eminent Domain)!

Unlock! — My wife loves these puzzle/escape room games, so I was happy to pick up a few more adventures.

Call of Cthulhu: Nameless Horrors — Six new adventures for CoC RPG, and it was only $15! Let the sanity checks begin!

Eminent Domain: Oblivion — Yes, yes, and more yes! Finally that Politics card gets to be a role! I am super-pumped to integrate this expansion into one of my favorite games.

King of New York: Anubis Monster Pack — A new monster and it even has a Pyramid die!

Day Two was more about taking in the convention than grabbing Games, but still we found a couple things.

— day two loot

Near and Far — This game looks cool…and I got the next to last copy at the booth too! Is it a legacy game, a worker placement game in the vein of Raiders of the North Sea, or an RPG disguised as a board game? Is it all three? Did I mention that the maps are in a spiral-ring notebook? The art is great too!

Cat Lady — Saw this at the AEG booth and I had to buy it for my wife. She loves cats.

Star Realms Promos — Yep, picked up some free promos. You want to know why? Well I’m not telling you…at least not tell my next post!

Is Star Wars Battlefront 2 Scripted Like FIFA or Madden?

I am a 25+ year veteran of playing Electronic Arts (EA) sports video games. I started with NHL in the 1990s, and then played Madden a little bit before settling into 15+ years of playing FIFA. In that time I (and many others in the EA community of players) noticed a worrying trend: the games seemed to be “scripted.” Now I play Star Wars Battlefront 2 from EA and its my belief that after the latest patch, that game is scripted too.

— photo courtesy of my TV and my iPad

Scripting in EA Sports Franchise Games

When does LeBron James miss a wide-open dunk with no pressure from any opponent? When does Harry Kane miss a tap-in a few feet from the goal while under no pressure? The answer is never. These athletes only make mistakes under pressure. Okay, how many times does Manchester United lose to Trondheim in a European match? Same answer: never.

Scripting in EA sports games creates both these absurd and unlikely events. When I played FIFA, in some games my players just couldn’t pass straight, shoot straight, or tackle. My best player would miss a tap in while under zero pressure. But….the other team could pass right around me, and in the dying minutes they somehow would score a miraculous goal.

Maybe it was bad luck? Maybe I didn’t play well that game? Okay…I would replay the game by not saving the results. Guess what happened next? I would lose the next game BY THE EXACT SAME SCORE! This my good friends is called “scripting.” EA developers have admitted that the sports games have “momentum” added to them to make some games “more competitive.” Players from all over the world have complained about the scripting.

The problem with scripting is that you are not really playing the game. The results and gameplay are not influenced at all by whatever you are doing with the controller. If you don’t believe me just google EA and scripting. Check out the discussions and decide for yourself. Many of us gamers turned away and are turning away from the EA sports games because of scripting.

Star Wars Battlefront 2 and Scripting

Let me preface this discussion by saying that I have played all the Star Wars Battlefront games. In Battlefront 1 I was one of the best star pilots in the world. In Battlefront 2, my brother and I play routinely. We usually score in the top 5 on our side and quite often we appear in the MVP standings at the end (you can find mine as screenshots on Xbox One–look for njesse99).

Since the last update in late spring, we have noticed some changes. One change is the major imbalance in teams. EA changed the scoring of battle points to allow players to gain them much quicker. This has led to the first team to get a hero overwhelming the other team. It works this way: we get a hero 1st, that hero starts slaying opponents, guys on our side get assist points and easier kills, we get more heroes, the other side can’t get points, the other side can’t get heroes (or gets them one at a time), we win easily. Almost all games now are blow outs: either you win quick and easy, or you get stomped.

But there is another problem: the appearance of scripting. Lately it goes like this: I set a trap that I have set a thousand times BUT now it doesn’t work. For example, I wait around a corner with my assault shotgun ready, a guy walks into my sights, I blast him, BUT he doesn’t die (like he normally would). That guy turns and shoots me once with a pistol and even though I shoot him a second time with my shotgun, I die and he doesn’t? Say what?!? Yeah, something that works every time suddenly doesn’t. LeBron missed the dunk; Kane missed the tap-in.

And it is more than that. My shots suddenly do less damage, every shot that hits me seems to kill me instantly, my ion torpedo doesn’t blow up the turret this time, etc. Maybe it was just my bad luck and/or bad game play? Nope! When the game ends and I check my stats, my meager six kills put me in the top 3 on my side. EVERYONE on my side had bad luck and/or bad game play! Hardly possible.

The problem with scripting is that you usually don’t notice it when every shot you take kills an opponent. You only notice it when you are on the receiving end. But it is real and clearly Star Wars Battlefront 2 now has it. I noticed it because of my experience with the EA sports games. The frustration of nothing going right and the impossible happening again and again is what gives it away. If Lebrun missed dunk after dunk he would guess that the rim was smaller than normal. Well in an EA franchise, the game decides when the rim is smaller or even closed.

Another Franchise Ruined by EA

EA has done it again. They have ruined another franchise by adding scripting to the game. It made some sense in Games with micro transactions: scripting makes good players lose, giving them the artificial need to buy more packs to strengthen their team. It is fake, they don’t really need to strengthen their team, but they don’t know that and EA makes more money when players buy packs.

But why put scripting in Battlefront 2? EA got rid of micro transactions early after releasing the game. Do they think the “run over” gameplay will attract new players? I doubt it. Is EA planning to reintroduce micro transactions? That’s my bet. So fellow Battlefront 2 players, if crates and micro transactions come back, you will know why. EA has been setting you up.